10 Overhyped Health Products…according the U.S. FDA

Informed consumers try to keep up with the latest health news. Unfortunately, many of the health products hyped in the media and promoted by celebrities aren't necessarily good for you. As a matter of fact, over-hyped products can range from those which are just ineffective to ones that can actually harm you. Here are some of the notes:

 

  1. Gluten-Free Products

The one percent of the population suffering from celiac disease needs to avoid gluten. For the other 99 percent, substituting gluten-free for regular pasta, for example, won't make you lose weight, have more energy, or make a million dollars in real estate. If you suspect you have celiac disease, consult your health care provider for antibody testing.

 

  1. Detox Cleanses

There is no medical evidence that fad detox diets, which basically consist of fasts supplemented by small quantities of odd food combos such as cayenne pepper and maple syrup, actually remove toxins from your body. Also, any weight loss is mainly water weight, not fat. Accordingly, the weight will be back on in just a few days.

 

  1. Cellulite Creams

Cellulite is lumpy fat. Only Photoshop can completely remove it. However, some retinol-based creams may slightly improve its appearance, as can liposuction. Of course, a more recommended choice is losing body fat through diet and exercise.

 

  1. Energy Drinks

Professional football players or marathon runners may need energy drinks, but for most of us, they are just sugar-laden bottles full of empty calories.

 

  1. Antibacterial Hand Soap

On one hand, antibacterial soaps are not widely accepted as better than regular soap and water for preventing illness and, on the other hand, they contain potentially harmful chemicals such as triclosan and triclocarban.

 

  1. Vitamin Supplements

A well-balanced diet may provide all the vitamins and minerals you need. The problem is that many people don’t usually have ‘a well-balanced diet’.  So vitamins may be a good idea, but there is a possibility of overdosing, which can vary from simply wasting money to serious medical problems. To avoid the negative effects of overdosing on supplements, especially iron and fat-soluble vitamins, consult your health care provider before taking supplements.

 

  1. Protein Supplements

Most Americans get plenty of protein. Unless you are a professional bodybuilder or have a medical condition requiring supplementation, protein powder supplements are just added calories.

 

  1. Cold Remedies

Drugstores are filled with cold remedies, ranging from herbal concoctions to nasal sprays and pills. There is not a lot of proof that any products significantly reduce your chances of getting a cold or shorten its duration or severity. If you get a cold, a good plan is to take it easy for a few days and eat healthy. Contact your health care provider if you experience high fever, trouble breathing, or don't get better after a few days.

 

  1. Toning Shoes

Does a pair of shoes that tones your legs and butt with no extra effort on your part sound too good to be true? The Federal Trade Commission made Reebok refund $25 million to customers and stop making deceptive claims in their advertising for toning shoes.

 

  1. Yogurt

Yogurt is not a miracle cure for digestive problems, aging, or yeast infections. It can replenish natural gut bacteria after you've been on antibiotics, but in general, it's just a nutritious and flavorful addition to your diet, not a panacea.

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Reference:

S. Food and Drug Administration: 6 Tip-offs to Rip-offs: Don't Fall for Health Fraud Scams

fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm341344.htm

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